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In the Other Press

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Review :: Health issues

Rolling Stone: The Worst President In History?

Many historians are now wondering whether Bush, in fact, will be remembered as the very worst president in all of American history.

In early 2004, an informal survey of 415 historians conducted by the nonpartisan History News Network found that eighty-one percent considered the Bush administration a "failure." Among those who called Bush a success, many gave the president high marks only for his ability to mobilize public support and get Congress to go along with what one historian called the administration's "pursuit of disastrous policies." In fact, roughly one in ten of those who called Bush a success was being facetious, rating him only as the best president since Bill Clinton — a category in which Bush is the only contestant.

The lopsided decision of historians should give everyone pause. Contrary to popular stereotypes, historians are generally a cautious bunch. We assess the past from widely divergent points of view and are deeply concerned about being viewed as fair and accurate by our colleagues. When we make historical judgments, we are acting not as voters or even pundits, but as scholars who must evaluate all the evidence, good, bad or indifferent. Separate surveys, conducted by those perceived as conservatives as well as liberals, show remarkable unanimity about who the best and worst presidents have been.

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News :: Media

Networking: Human error largely to blame

CHICAGO, April 17 (UPI) — What's the most grave IT security threat today? Hackers? Overly complicated corporate networks? None of the above, experts are telling United Press International's Networking column. Good, old-fashioned human error — not nefarious, new technologies or super-sophisticated computer geeks, holed up in a shack near the Caspian Sea by the Russian mafia — are to blame for about 60 percent of IT security breaches.

A new survey, a copy of which was provided to Networking, by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA), said human error is increasing as an IT problem. Last year, only 47 percent of security breaches were blamed on human error alone. By Gene Koprowski

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News :: Civil and Human Rights : Crime and Police : Military : Surveillance/censorship

America’s Secret Police? Is the Pentagon creating a secret police force?

April 12, 2006 - A threatened turf grab by a controversial Pentagon intelligence unit is causing concern among both privacy experts and some of the Defense Department’s own personnel.

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News :: Media

Networking: Gamers get satisfaction

The filthy rich do nothing but play games on their mobile phones all day.
CHICAGO, April 10 (UPI) — Special agent Ethan Hunt — a.k.a. Tom Cruise — suddenly appears on your mobile phone's color screen. You're being recruited to be a non-official cover intelligence asset. As Hollywood prepares to premiere the third installment in the "Mission: Impossible" film franchise, Paramount Pictures, and producers Cruise and Paula Wagner, are working with a mobile-gaming company to bring the action right to your "third screen." Is it any wonder, experts are telling United Press International's Networking column, that, with interactive games like this, consumers are today very satisfied with the level of performance of their mobile networks?

A new survey, released last week by London-based I-play, the mobile entertainment company, demonstrates that 79 percent of mobile gamers were either very satisfied or satisfied with the mobile games they played over wireless carriers' networks. As the market has come under close scrutiny by investors on Wall Street, for its investment potential, the survey shows that mobile game networks are not for the extreme geek fringe anymore, but are really appealing to consumers. By Gene Koprowski

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News :: Health issues : Military : Right-wing politics

Hersh: The Iran Plans

seymour hersh's connections say that the delusional war preznit is seriously looking at the nookular option. read it & then change your drawers.

also see: "Bush 'is planning nuclear strikes on Iran's secret sites'"
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;jsessionid=C3HY5I431EHHRQFIQMGSFFWAVCBQWIV0?xml=/news/2006/04/09/wbush09.xml&sSheet=/portal/2006/04/09/ixportaltop.html

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News :: Civil and Human Rights : Crime and Police

Police strike back at television reporter

A Broward police union put personal information on the Web about a reporter for a South Florida television station after he produced a piece called `Police Station Intimidation.'

The personal information of an investigative reporter was posted prominently on a South Florida police union's website after a local television station aired a report about how police in Broward and Miami-Dade counties deal with the public.

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News :: Civil and Human Rights : Crime and Police : Right-wing politics : Surveillance/censorship

Unmanned Aerial Drones Coming Soon Above U.S.

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been flying over Iraq and Afghanistan, but now the Bush administration wants to use them for domestic surveillance. A top Homeland Security official told Congress today, according to this CNET News.com article, that: "We need additional technology to supplement manned aircraft surveillance and current ground assets to ensure more effective monitoring of United States territory." One county in North Carolina is already using UAVs to monitor public gatherings. But what happens when lots of relatively dumb drones have to share airspace with aircraft carrying passengers? A pilot's association is worried.

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News :: Civil and Human Rights : Crime and Police

80 Eyes on 2.400 People

From Anchorage it takes 90 minutes on a propeller plane to reach this fishing village on the state's southwestern edge, a place where some people still make raincoats out of walrus intestine.

This is the Alaskan bush at its most remote. Here, tundra meets sea, and sea turns to ice for half the year. Scattered, almost hidden, in the terrain are some of the most isolated communities on American soil. People choose to live in outposts like Dillingham (pop. 2,400) for that reason: to be left alone.

So eyebrows were raised in January when the first surveillance cameras went up on Main Street. Each camera is a shiny white metallic box with two lenses like eyes. The camera's shape and design resemble a robot's head.

Workers on motorized lifts installed seven cameras in a 360-degree cluster on top of City Hall. They put up groups of six atop two light poles at the loading dock, and more at the fire hall and boat harbor.

By mid-February, more than 60 cameras watched over the town, and the Dillingham Police Department plans to install 20 more — all purchased through a $202,000 Homeland Security grant meant primarily to defend against a terrorist attack.

Now the residents of this far-flung village have become, in one sense, among the most watched people in the land, with — as former Mayor Freeman Roberts puts it — "one camera for every 30 residents."

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Quote-of-the-Moment

An inglorious peace is better than a dishonorable war.
-- Mark Twain
Source: "Glances at History" (suppressed)
 

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